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RWD - 20 amp inline fuse at battery

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20 amp inline fuse at battery 200 1989

Hi. This is my first time doing this so if I'm doing it wrong let me know. I just purchased a 1989 Volvo 240 DL that the previous owner says the inline fuse at the battery keeps blowing. He reported history of the car is as follows- the car was running fine but he noticed the voltmeter was indicating 12 volts and it seemed like the car was taking longer to start. Change the voltage regulator and started the car on the first attempt. He then disconnected the battery cables and the car died. He discovered the inline fuse has blown so I put another one in. Attempted to start car with no start but engine turns over. Fuse blows again. He then changes fuel pump relay same thing. He then changes ECU same thing. He then becomes frustrated and sells the car to me for a deal. The car blows the fuse as soon as the ignition switch is turned on before before engine turns over. I have disconnected both fuel pumps if you still blows. When I disconnect the ECU the fuse does not blow. I have the old ECU that he replaced and when I hook it up to that the fuse blows. I have limited electrical experience but can operate a multimeter four simple checks. I don't have a book with a wiring diagram and even if I did probably couldn't read it. Any ideas where should i start.?





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    Disconnected battery with engine running? 200 1989

    "Change the voltage regulator and started the car on the first attempt. He then disconnected the battery cables and the car died."
    With modern computerized cars, I'm pretty sure you shouldn't disconnect a battery with the engine running and the alternator operating because of possible voltage and current spikes which could fry the electronics.

    I don't have a computerized 240, but I think my sister's '89 takes a 25 amp fuse.

    The fuel pumps engage first to pressurize the system so would be the suspect high current draw before the starter is engaged to turn over the engine. But you've already tried disconnecting the fuel pumps. Hence something in that circuit may be shorted?
    --
    1980 245 Canadian B21A with SU carb, M46 trans, 3:31 dif, in Brampton, Ont.





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      Disconnected battery with engine running? 200 1989

      """"I'm pretty sure you shouldn't disconnect a battery with the engine running and the alternator operating because of possible voltage and current spikes which could fry the electronics.""""

      yes indeed, that is a not a good thing to do. In fact you are warned against doing it by Volvo -- I think it's written as a Warning somewhere in the Bentley Bible.

      Short story, I had a dying battery, but driving on the highway had been charging it enough to start the engine.
      I drove the car on a trip several hundred miles, stopped for gas and Fully Dead. Rolled it popped the clutch and drove it to a buy a new battery.

      The "mechanic" at the Battery store wouldn't believe me when I told him that my battery was just old and that's why it died. He insisted on "testing" it.

      The car was stll running as I never shut it off after jumping it. The "Tech" used his volt meter and then said he wanted to disconnect the battery while the car was running to see if the Alt was good or bad.

      I told him DO NOT DO THAT, you will fry my ECU...he said I do this all the time... Not on my car you don't. If you won't just sell me a new battery, I'm going somewhere else. That pissed him off.

      They reluctantly sold me a new battery, gripping...well when it dies it's on you because YOU wouldn't let us TEST the charging system.





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    Finding the short circuit 200 1989

    "Any ideas where should i start.?"

    KISS is for "keep it stupid simple."

    No need to crank or try to start the car, right?

    Here's where you start when the rain abates:

    Pull the electrical plugs from the air mass meter, idle air control, all four of the fuel injectors on the rail, and the fifth fuel injector under the intake manifold. Lift the rear bench seat and disconnect the plug on the yellow wire there. Remove the #4 fuse from the interior fuse panel.

    Now put a new fuse in at the battery. Turn the key to KP-2 (no need to crank the engine) and repeat this after putting every item disconnected above back one at a time until the fuse blows again, starting with #4 fuse.

    If it still blows with all those things disconnected, most likely there's short circuit caused by someone working on the car who has made a mistake. Some mistakes others have made are using the wrong fuel relay, the wrong air mass meter, pinching a wire while installing a radio, etc.

    Some things you may want to convey to us as you go: Wagon or sedan? Is AMM a -016? Is ECU a -561?
    --
    Art Benstein near Baltimore

    Flowers leave some of their fragrance in the hand that bestows them. -Ancient Chinese Proverb





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      Finding the short circuit 200 1989

      Hey Art. I did as you suggested and each time I reconnected an item the fuse remained intact all the way to the last item. I scratch my head and then started the car just fine. I'm guessing there was some corrosion or something I don't know but it's running now. Maybe I should say it's running for now. Anywho thanks for the suggestions. I'm still trying to figure my way out around this form unfortunately I'm having to use my phone as I don't have a computer and it gets a little complicated sometimes. Thanks to all that offered up suggestions





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        Finding the short circuit 200 1989

        Hi,

        Good for you!
        Apparently you got close enough to the gremlin to scare it away from a grounding point.
        I don’t see corrosion alone blowing fuses but only keeping things from working correctly or not at all.

        Is this car has an automatic transmission or not?
        I’m curious as I started with eliminating the switch position three as it was never said “just when the fuse was blowing?”
        The car just stopped going and the PO made a deal to lose it.

        I meant to suggest putting in a test light rigged up on the wire from the fuse in the junction block terminals over to ground to indicate blowing fuse.
        With this light on shining out to you, when you wiggled the short or turned the key through it’s positions, it tells you exactly when the fuse gets blown.
        I had it written this up earlier, in a longer draft and then changed my mind about how involved it was!
        If there was something going on inside the engine compartments harness you would be right out there with it.
        Even a mild sounding piezoelectric buzzer would be better as it can get your attention when hunting under a dash!
        Either signal would have helped you during both processes!
        Art’s written procedure, is of course, a lot simpler than mine ever could be!
        Rip it all out and put back as needed, I guess?
        I think backwards it seems, in smaller steps and not so willing to leap!

        If the ignition switch was or is crossing up internally you would have seen it in a blink or with silence.
        Both of those items are subject to the abuse of human hands and can suffer wear from various mistreatments.
        Down inside the shifter of the automatic the parts are made of plastic. On both transmission types the wires or terminals can dangle or be rubbed by edges or carpet.

        I was wanting to start later in the fuse panel, in the switch position two, after clearing position three as the possible fuse blower.
        Now if the neutral switch or the engines harness wiring got have moved around that may have cleared it for now?
        But since Art’s side of the hunt was inconclusive to nail it, it must be OK, like you said, “for now.”

        Gremlins love to be intermittently playful and while in hiding in sheaths and hard to see places, they leave things unreliable.
        Corrosion is usually green in color, just like the illustrated cartoon characters are!
        If and when you do find them, they get to wear white coats, due to the winter months of salt festivity’s! (:).
        Good olé aluminum grounds are those that “hide in plain sight” and are the special smiling ones, we say too, “That doesn’t look so bad.”
        A 5 volt or less signals from BUS communication computers won’t help either! On the newest “Accessorized” combustion engine cars, that alone will sign cars into a scrapyard, at any age, fast!

        My prediction is, we are headed into electric propulsion faster than we think! Engine oil and antifreeze might be all gone too!
        I’ll be loving to know cow urine is “not” coming out of “any” Diesel exhausts, period!

        The 240’s have survived by design to do a job with reasonability!

        Phil





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      Finding the short circuit 200 1989

      Hi Art!

      I like to reverse the last two words in KISS so I put the blame where it belongs! On Me!

      In poking fun of the Internet, I will say you are talking like this guys video.
      A real life experience of what you might find while in a hunt for electrical gremlins.

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=o0SkX3ljQpc

      Phil





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    20 amp inline fuse at battery 200 1989

    Hi,

    Is the solenoid drawing to much or the ignition switch bad? That’s my first question?

    We need to put the neutral switch, on an automatic, in a different position, in case there is a short in the transmission switch?
    I tell you this just in case there is a shorting happening while using the number three position of the ignition switch and you haven’t check this out! (?)

    A WORD OF CAUTION ABOUT WHAT I’m GOING TO TELL YOU!
    YOU MUST BE IN NEUTRAL WITH THE TRANSMISSION! No matter which type!


    There is a wire, back by the firewall, near the oil dip stick, that can be used to bypass position three and the ignition start circuit through the fuse. It will roll the engines starter motor only!
    You take a wire directly from the positive post of the battery to that wire and it closes the solenoid and then the main cables roll the starter motor.

    Now, If the ignition key is left in position “two” the car should start. There is no fuse to blow but you will have to disconnect the starter upon starting or the starter will keep on going!

    Just to see if the car starts this way before going electrical hunting!

    I have a whole bunch of other things to work through but after trying to write that stuff up, I decided to KISS it!

    Phil





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      20 amp inline fuse at battery 200 1989

      Thanks a bunch. If and when it stops raining this weekend I'll go give that a whirl.





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